verandah tales

wool

cups of tea
view

pegs and grapes

grapes

skull

gloves

for planting

squares thus far

reading about snakes
crochet tools

crochet

quilt
maple and sky

how to make hash browns

stack

popcorn

:: Noah and I shopped for soft mushy shades at Morris and Sons yesterday – he was in Melbourne, I was here at Wombat Hill – it was a lovely collaboration

:: today’s the first Saturday we’ve all been at home with nothing else to do for so many months – so Noah and I made tea, gathered our supplies and settled onto the verandah

:: oh the green!  in this the last month of summer, every corner of our home is still enveloped in lush richness – fields of long grass, swathes of grape vine, the evergrowing japanese maple

:: these grapes!  piquant with thick skins, finger licking juice and a nice plump seed in the midst of each one – just as a grape should be

:: so much planting to do – more herbs and some greens for quick picking

:: completely inspired by this – colours I have never put together before – but sing to me not of snowy Swedish landscapes, but of faded summer days, bleached by the strong Australian sun

:: he is the loveliest of companions – his interests are so varied and interesting – first it’s snakes (we have plenty of these) and then onto the perfect hash brown

:: and then the breeze picks up and brings with it an icy edge, a reminder that the days are shortening and we are reaching for quilts

:: meanwhile, when I cannot bear to crochet another stitch, the country living sends me straight into the kitchen for maple and cinnamon popcorn

Oh it was indeed a lovely verandah afternoon and such a pleasure to be here, all together, in our new home

an abundance of quilt tops

stack of quilts

With the house almost all packed up, yesterday was time for me to tackle the sewing shed – with Noah and Mum’s help – far too big a job to dare on my own!  Oh my.  For many years now, the sewing shed has not functioned as a PLACE to sew.  Instead it’s become the Tardis of all things stitchy.  I confess there’s been many a day I have simply stood at it’s door and THROWN the stuff in.  You can tell.

Hours were spent pulling stuff out of drawers and cabinets and half filled boxes, sorting it all into some semblance of order – there are now wool boxes, fabric boxes, trim boxes, vintage linen boxes, must-open-straight-away boxes (there’s a silly number of them!), boxes for the opshop, and a small wheelie bin full of “for goodness sake! why on earth did I keep this!”
sewing shed

There were many ooooohs and ahhhhhhs as we rediscovered things that hadn’t been seen for years, and sighed over treasures we completely forgot we even had.  But the loveliest moment came when we found a pile of colourful quilt tops and unfinished quilts.  Some quilts that hadn’t seen the light of day since leaving Brisbane 6 years ago!

It was so lovely remembering when and where I’d bought the fabric, where and with whom I’d sat and made it, what we’d been doing as a family at that time … Quilts are especially marvellous how they hold all these memories aren’t they.

red white and blue

This huge lovely was inspired by an antique quilt.  I started off sewing each block by hand but quickly became impatient with that!  I have had a go at hand quilting it, but once we get to the farm, I shall be whipping those clumsy stitches out and getting stuck into it on my big sewing machine.  I think it will look so tranquil and pretty on our bed in our pale blue-grey room.

american jane

I bought the fabric for this quilt with Julian – one quiet Saturday afternoon at the Quilters’ and Embroiderers’ store when they were still in the little old cottage in Auchenflower.  Then went straight home and sewed and sewed and sewed and sewed!  It’s crazy bright – Mum would like it for one of her spare beds – perfect!

tumblers

I was especially excited to find this vintage tumbler quilt.  I whipped it up one winter’s day – and long into the night – when we were living at Mum’s before we moved to Melbourne – and then it vanished into the box of never-never and I had absolutely no idea what had become of it.  Look at that border!  Look at all those wonderful reproduction fabrics!  So rich and pretty.  It too is in the pile to finish lickety-split.  It will be just lovely folded on the end of our bed for cosy naps :-)

noah

crazy stars

I remember starting these crazy star blocks in our little tumbledown house in Norman Park and finally putting them all together with the offset sashing at Mum’s.  Now I’ll have to track down some white with green spot fabric to finish the borders and then it needs a lovely border like the tumbler quilt I think – maybe instead of “bowls” I’ll do “balls”.  They will be stars and planets.

piles

folding them up

needs unquilting

Now this pretty four patch was the first quilt I made in Melbourne.  Most of the fabric came from the stash but I think I ordered the large squares of bird fabric from the FatQuarterShop.  Very gentle and sweet, this one is.  However the crooked lines of machine quilting are rubbish!  So I’m paying Noah to unpick it and then I shall start again.  It will be lovely for our caravanning guests.

sunhats

Oh the Sunhat Quilt!  This was stitched up in a couple of days, using fabric all from the stash, on Mum’s back deck in Kangaroo Point.  The frangipani was in full bloom, the air was sultry, the sky brilliant blue, Noah was on school holidays so there were lovely days of friends coming to play and lots of laughter, and every afternoon we were oh so glad when the seabreeze came tickling down the hallway.  It just needs pinning out and it’s ready to quilt!

completely forgotten

And this sweet little number – truly, I have no recollection of ever starting this.  But hey, I love the fabric and colours.  So into the must-open-straight-away box it goes.

There’s nowhere at Wombat Hill for a dedicated sewing room – Julian says he will one day build me a little studio, nestled into the trees with lots of light, and waist high built in shelves all the way around.  In my dreams it also has one of my lovely hard-rubbished vintage sofas upholstered with woollen blankets, the perfect sewing table with space for several people to sit around making, and a little wood burning stove to keep us cosy over the long cool months.

Julian says this dream is a few years down the track but I don’t know about that! There is just so much fabric, a little studio may become a necessity!

(Did you hear that, it was Julian roaring with laughter ;-)

let’s be still

 

bench ends

close up

under the oak

snacks

julian

olives

dubious

crackers

alway so connected

hopeful

on her perch

every vantage point

hungry

funny little chooks with their feathers not yet in

so patient

After 3 lovely days of rest, today was back to work.  There are only 15 days until the removalists arrive and sooooooo much to be done.

Today, Mum and I headed off on quite the cross country trip collecting cast iron bench ends. Yup.  Cast iron bench ends.  Julian has a thing for antique cast iron and Mum and I have a thing for these bench ends – they remind us of the girls’ boarding school we both worked at – there were many scattered about the main old building for the students, both as benches and single seats.  So Julian’s collecting the ends to make Mum and I single seats which we will plonk at the loveliest spots around the farm.

After hours of driving and bench end collecting, we came home to car packing.  Another favourite occupation.  Each time it’s a cheerful challenge to see just how much we can squeeze into the back of our station wagon.

This time was pretty epic – after a few hours work, Mum and I (with a little help from Julian) managed to shove in an antique cedar meat safe, an Art Deco bookcase, a farmhouse style set of shelves for the wall, 3 sewing machines, umpteen quilts and cushions, a desk lamp, a vase, a huge glass bottle, all the glass bottled dry goods from the kitchen mantelpiece, the vintage electric jug collection, a suitcase of lace, a bosu balance ball, a vintage bird cage, a medicine ball, the canning pot, 2 deep fryers (one for candlemaking), a set of bamboo steamers, a wine rack, a huge kettle that used to belong to St. Mary’s that I have romantic dreams about boiling up on an open fire after our friends and family have gathered to make apple cider on a crisp autumn afternoon, a 4 kg medicine ball, 2 boxes of lego (that fitted into the birdcage), several paintings, 8 little Ikea boxes of patchwork projects, 4 little boxes of American girl clothes …

I’ve almost certainly missed things but it was an impressive effort.  And cross fingers it will all arrive safely.

So tomorrow morning, Mum and Julian head off – they are taking Julian’s motorbike up.  Well he is.  Mum’s following so that they can drive back to Melbourne together on Tuesday.  Isn’t she such an amazing Mum.

Meanwhile, I’ll be enduring another week of night duty with almost certainly packing and errands during those brief wakeful hours in the late afternoon.  And Noah will be packing and meeting up for fun times with friends just as all young people should when they’ve just finished school.

But right now,  I think we just need to gather under our beautiful oak, in summer’s setting sun, with good food before us, doggles waiting hopefully at our sides, dear little Orpingtons bustling about behind us, and plenty of giggles and silly conversation.

Yes, let’s be still.

 

gentle making

another one started

One of the lovely things about only visiting Wombat Hill for the last few months (as opposed to BEING there), is that once we arrive and unpack, there really are very few pressing chores for me to do.

Not much point gardening because we’re not there to take care of it.  Same for our animals – we can’t buy our chickens or goats or cows, until we are there to care for them.  Nor are we really sure where best to put them when we do get them, so whilst there has been lots of research on how to build their shelters, we’ve not got down to the nuts and bolts.

And of course, there’s no nursing shifts to be done.

Which leaves a whole lot of time for just pottering.  Something I do awfully well :-) Especially when there’s a beautiful verandah to sit, with my favourite people around me, and boxes of lovely supplies that magically managed to get squeezed into the car.

Just small and simple things.  Easy to make, quick to finish.  So very lovely.
dishcloth knitted

So on our last trip, new kitchen dishcloths were knitted …

pinned out

binding to be sewn down

blanket stitching the edge

edge scalloped

I not only covered a lovely big milo tin with some of Heather Ross’s fabulous new Tiger Lily fabric, but I crocheted a scalloped edge on it, and then served chickpeas for the next 2 night’s supper so I could cover those tins too! (Strangely enough there are no photos of them – I’m sure they’ll pop up in future posts)

birthday fabrics

quilting the copic wrap

Noah asked for something handmade for his birthday – and as he also requested more copic markers, I sewed up an epic quilted copic marker wrap.  It has space for 2 notebooks and 40 copic markers – that could be easily squeezed up to 80 if he puts 2 in each slot.  (Again, no finished photos – slack I know!)

new curtain for dresser

A new yellow curtain (made from a divine Lecien print of which I bought every last centimetre Darn Cheap had! And I bought its mates in red and green!) was whipped up for the kitchen dresser – now that the walls are painted a glorious egg yolk yellow, the dresser really needed something a little brighter than civil war blue.  Which means it needs new wee prairie point bunting for the shelves – sigh! fancy being obliged to make more prairie point bunting :-)

I do adore Lecien’s little floral prints – they remind me of the lovely dresses my Mum made for us in the 1970s – and are exactly the kind of fabric I always imagined Ma making Laura and Mary’s dresses from. Delicious!
D72_2018

I started a beautiful project with Misti Alpaca from the knitting baskets that were secretly stuffed into Tuppance’s corners – an Advent shawl – a new clue each morning.  Oh and I was so good whilst at Wombat Hill – every evening I was all excited about what would be published the next morning, and then I was up just after 5am, coffee pot and cup before me, out on the verandah in the “good morning sun”, cheerfully knitting up my next several rows.  Alas, since I’ve returned to Melbourne, there has been only the tiniest amount of knitting accomplished and I am weeks behind.  Hmph!

echidna cushion

echidna

I even stitched up one of Elizabeth Hartman’s wonderful Hazel Hedgehogs!  It became a cushion for the front verandah – only it’s not Hazel – it’s clearly her Australian cousin Evie Echidna.  They are everywhere in our neck of the woods – wombling across the grass and shyly sticking their noses into the dirt in the hope that if they can’t see us, we surely won’t see them!

Oh we do love them so – one day, on a utterly failed trip to buy donkey poo for the garden, Noah and I came across one toddling along the side of our little secret road (I’ll tell you about that another time) – we pulled over on the other side, hopped out and spent so long quietly watching her that Julian was quite sure we’d decided to ride the donkeys home!  Noah wants a tamish one that will come visit each day.  High hopes there methinks.

I clearly need to get back to Wombat Hill – there’s more gentle making a-calling – especially the kind that requires sitting on that verandah for long and lovely hours, a nice drink by my side and my favourite folks nearby.